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Antiques & Collecting Magazine July 2006 Moss Lamps, Betty Boop, Steam Toys, Travel Posters, Scottie Dog Collectibles

Product Description
This issue features Scottie Dog collectibles-6 pages with many photos + a recommended reading list, Betty Boop-4 pages, many photos, Steam Toys, Travel Posters-5 pages, many photos (see pictures posted) and Moss Lamps-on cover + 7 pages and many photo examples of these lamps…. More >>

Antiques & Collecting Magazine July 2006 Moss Lamps, Betty Boop, Steam Toys, Travel Posters, Scottie Dog Collectibles

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by - February 16, 2017 at 9:30 pm

Categories: Vintage Steam Toys   Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Collecting Outdoor Toy Trains

Toy trains are normally seen indoors in a mixture of settings. The most popular display is all around a Christmas tree, circling the perimeter all-around all the gifts. Some people opt to set their personal unique show for year-round viewing inside their apartment. But seldom will you find a toy coach show outdoors; mainly as a result of the fear of damaging the toy train process. However, there are many toy trains and toy teach systems that are meant just for outdoors, and you’re about to get a glimpse of a few of the most common outdoor toy trains!

Firstly, you need to recognize how to put together a great outdoor teach process. Outside model trains should invariably be put in a secure location, and should be as level as feasible. You might want to think about adding your outside coach method for your garden, or designing a garden all-around your toy train. You will only have to have a single track railway, one locomotive and 3 to 4 bits of rolling rock to get moving. Dig a trench about two or three ins deep that your educate track route will follow. Fill it with sand and set your track in location, then spot far more sand within the track to make it even with the ground. This will help supply you with a level ground to operate your practice technique. Now that you’ve got the construction aspect full, it’s time to opt for your outside toy train!

The Lionel Silver Bell Express by the Lionel Corporation is a beautiful addition to your outdoor Christmas show. This gorgeous locomotive is sure to be the focus at your next holiday party or gathering. The toy trains shimmers in the frosty blue and silver color, and is including a musical caboose that plays an enjoyable version of “Jingle Alarms,” “Silent Night”, and “Santa Clause is Coming to Town”. The Silver Bell Express is controlled by a transformer that permits you to move the locomotive forward or reverse. Hand-painted detail and realistic decals make this outdoor toy teach look love it just originated from Santa’s Workshop! The gauge is big scale and 51″ in diameter, making it big enough to complete any outdoor decoration. The Silver Bell Express can be obtained new for all-around $200 or you could try your luck at an auction to attempt to snag this beauty for a cheaper price.

The LGB Trains G Scale Hooker Modern Tank Auto is a superb choice for your outdoor toy teach technique. This outside train can be a current version of the classic toy coach familiar to a lot of adults. The powerful locomotive can simply pull numerous freight or passenger cars and you can actually fill the tank with water to create an out of date steam engine effect. The Hooker Modern day Tank Car sells for all-around $85.

These are simply a few of the many choices available for the outside toy practice exhibit. With proper construction and smart shopping, it is possible to build a toy educate wonderland right in your own backyard!

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by - July 19, 2010 at 10:39 pm

Categories: Vintage Steam Trains   Tags: , ,

Old Stock Collecting Themes – Part II

Most people collect antique stock certificates by type, or theme, to give a common thread to their collection and to add passion to the search for specific certificates (though most of us also “cheat” and collect others just because we like them).

Collecting themes also provides a logical way to organize or display your favorite stock certificates.

The “Part I” article before this one discussed themes of Industry, Geography, Vignette (artwork), Family Relationship (name) and Time Period. Here are some other popular themes:

1.Events, or some portion of one – Examples: Civil War, Confederate Institutions, Volunteer Bounty Bonds, Veterans Organizations

2.Firsts, or among the firsts – Examples: Experimental Aircraft (Custer Channel Wing), Steam Locomotives (Tom Thumb), seminal autos (Willys-Overland Jeep), first electrically wired cities (Cincinnati Edison), current companies over a century old (Wells Fargo)

3.Famous Names, issued to or signed by – Examples: Disney, Remington, Rockefeller, Pabst, Houdini, Rothschild, Chaplin, Buick, Morgan, Ames, Lorillard…

4.Extreme Numbers on the certificate – Examples: Bonds for $1,000,000 or more, stock certificates for more than 10,000 shares or less than 10 shares, company capital of less than $1 million, low registration number (three digits or less)

5.Unissued (the printed date usually has a blank in it, such as 187_) – These are certificates that were never authorized, filled out and given to a share owner. They have usually come from storage and archives of the companies, banks and printers that were involved with the issuance process.

Some people prefer unissued documents because they often are in better condition than “used” certificates. Other collectors prefer issued ones because the names, writing and wear show they were held in people’s hands and used in commerce a century or more ago.

There are literally millions of permutations possible by crossing themes. For example, if your family can be traced to Philadelphia, you might collect issued, canceled (the word is usually spelled with one L, but not always), green certificates that have one or two digit registration numbers with portrait vignettes from the 1800’s.

Or, maybe not. If your family name is Miller, you could just buy Grandpa a “Millerstown Iron Company” stock certificate, have it framed and give it to him for Christmas. Guaranteed, he won’t get duplicates of that gift.

So you can decide on a theme(s), or just browse and absorb and maybe a theme will develop as you learn more about what’s available and what strikes that special cord in you.

If nothing else, you will find fascinating insights into the people and things that made this country.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by - June 29, 2010 at 3:41 am

Categories: Vintage Steam Locomotives   Tags: , , ,

Stock Certificate Collecting Themes – II

Most people collect antique stock certificates by type, or theme, to give a common thread to their collection and to add passion to the search for specific certificates (though most of us also “cheat” and collect others just because we like them). Collecting themes also provides a logical way to organize or display your favorite stock certificates.

The “Part I” article before this one discussed themes of Industry, Geography, Vignette (artwork), Family Relationship (name) and Time Period.  Here are some other popular themes:

1. Events, or some portion of one –
Examples:  Civil War, Confederate Institutions, Volunteer Bounty Bonds, Veterans Organizations

2. Firsts, or among the firsts –
Examples:  Experimental Aircraft (Custer Channel Wing), Steam Locomotives (Tom Thumb), seminal autos (Willys-Overland Jeep), first electrically wired cities (Cincinnati Edison), current companies over a century old (Wells Fargo)

3. Famous Names, issued to or signed by –
Examples:  Rockefeller, Disney, Remington, Pabst, Houdini, Rothschild, Chaplin, Buick, Morgan, Ames, Lorillard…

4. Extreme Numbers on the certificate –
Examples:  Bonds for $1,000,000 or more, stock certificates for more than 10,000 shares or less than 10 shares, company capital of less than $1 million, low registration number (three digits or less)

5. Unissued (the printed date usually has a blank in it, such as 187_) –
These are certificates that were never authorized, filled out and given to a share owner.  They have usually come from storage and archives of the companies, banks and printers that were involved with the issuance process.

Some people prefer unissued documents because they often are in better condition than “used” certificates.  Other collectors prefer issued ones because the names, writing and wear show they were held in people’s hands and used in commerce a century or more ago.

There are literally millions of permutations possible by crossing themes.  For example, if your family can be traced to Philadelphia, you might collect issued, canceled (the word is usually spelled with one L, but not always), green certificates that have one or two digit registration numbers with portrait vignettes from the 1800’s.

Or, maybe not.  If your family name is Miller, you could just buy Grandpa a “Millerstown Iron Company” stock certificate, have it framed and give it to him for Christmas.  Guaranteed, he won’t get duplicates of that gift.

So you can decide on a theme(s), or just browse and absorb and maybe a theme will develop as you learn more about what’s available and what strikes that special cord in you.  If nothing else, you will find fascinating insights into the people and things that made this country.

Be the first to comment - What do you think?  Posted by - June 20, 2010 at 4:06 am

Categories: Vintage Steam Locomotives   Tags: , , ,